SEND inquiry launched by the Education Committee

The House of Commons Education Committee has today launched an inquiry into support for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). The new inquiry is intended to review the success of the SEND reforms, how they have been implemented, and what impact they are having in meeting the challenges faced by children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities.

On the launch of the inquiry, Rt Hon Robert Halfon MP, Chair of the Education Committee, said: “One of the primary objectives of the Education Committee is to address social injustice in education. Understanding and addressing the challenges faced by children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities is an important part of this work.

“It has been four years since major SEND reforms were introduced and it’s important we examine whether the Government’s stated ambitions for simpler, improved and consistent help for children and young people with SEND have been met. There are rising concerns about the quality and access to SEN provision which the Committee will want to explore in this inquiry. The Committee’s current inquiry into alternative provision has heard considerable evidence that children with special educational needs are disproportionately excluded from school and over-represented in alternative provision. During the course of our quality of apprenticeships and skills training inquiry we’ve also heard that with young people with SEN have faced significant barriers in accessing apprenticeships. 

“All children deserve to access good quality education that meets their needs and supports them to learn to ensure that they are able to thrive and climb the ladder of opportunity. The 2014 Act extended provision to young people up to the age of 25 and the Committee is particularly keen to hear evidence about whether there is the right support available to enable young people to access appropriate post-18 opportunities such as studying at FE colleges and undertaking apprenticeships.”

The Committee is inviting written evidence on the following by 14 June 2018:

  • Assessment of and support for children and young people with SEND
  • The transition from statements of special educational needs and Learning Disability Assessments to Education, Health and Care Plans
  • The level and distribution of funding for SEND provision
  • The roles of and co-operation between education, health and social care sectors
  • Provision for 19-25-year olds including support for independent living; transition to adult services; and access to education, apprenticeships and work 

In line with the general practice of select committees, the Education Committee resolved on 12 September 2017 to not investigate individual cases. The Committee understands that personal experiences will form an important part of many submissions, but requests that any written evidence directly addresses the terms of reference set out above.

Written evidence may be submitted confidentially or on the basis of anonymity; please make it clear at the beginning of your submission if you want this to be the case. Evidence may be edited prior to publication to remove personal information.

nasen wish to provide a response to the inquiry and we would value our members’ opinions. Please spare 5 minutes to share your opinions with us to help us shape our response. Complete survey.
 

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