Dr Adam Boddison announced as Visiting Professor

News - 08 Jul 2019

We are delighted to announce that the University of Wolverhampton has conferred the status of Visiting Professor of Education upon nasen’s Chief Executive, Dr Adam Boddison.

Visiting Professorships are honorary appointments that are awarded to distinguished academics or practitioners who are making a significant contribution to their sector. 

Professor Boddison said “I am both honoured and delighted at this appointment and I look forward to continuing my work with the University of Wolverhampton on a range of initiatives in relation to inclusion and to special educational needs and disabilities.  The University already has a ResearchSEND offer and this is an area I expect will grow and develop in the coming months”. 

Professor Michael Jopling, Professor in Education and Director, Education Observatory at the University of Wolverhampton, said: “It is with great pleasure that the university has conferred the title of Visiting Professor on Professor Adam Boddison. This new appointment will have significant benefit for the Education Observatory, the Institute of Education, and the university, and we very much look forward to welcoming Adam to work with us”.

Elaine Simpson, Chair of Trustees at nasen said: “I welcome the news of Adam’s professorship, which is in recognition of his work in SEND and education more broadly. This is a real testament to all he has achieved in his career and more recently with nasen, over the past few years”.

 

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